About the country

Home Study In Canada About the country

About the country

Canada is the largest country in North America and consists of 10 provinces and 3 territories. It is located in the northern part of the continent, and the capital of Canada is Ottawa. It is the second largest country in the world territory-wise. With its immigration, friendly policies study in Canada has become easier than ever. Also, it is a popular destination for vocational and diploma courses among international students.

Study guide to Canada for international students

Students always have this question in mind that how they can study in Canada from Nepal. The first step is to apply to a Canadian University. Once you receive admission, you can apply for a study permit for Canada. Also, students should also know the complete application process for Canada. In this guide, we will explain everything you need to know before moving to Canada. We will cover every aspect from their education system to popular universities in Canada for international students.

Education System

The school systems in Canada are different from each other, depending on the province or territory. Education is available in both English and in French in most places, provided there are enough students in that area speaking the secondary language. High school is typical to grades nine to 12. In Québec, high school ends in grade eleven and is followed by a program that prepares the student for university or a technical field called CEGEP.

Beyond this, students can attend either vocational schools or enter a university. At a university, they will first earn a Bachelor's degree and can continue studies to receive a Master's or a Doctorate degree. Vocational students will earn certificates and diplomas that will help improve their skills in various trades.

Popular student destinations:

Universities like Mc Gill University, The University of British Columbia, University of Alberta, and Simon Fraser University are popular choices if you want to pursue a full-time academic degree. Most of the best colleges in the country are situated in cities like Toronto, British Columbia, Montreal. The number of Indian students who got study permits in the year 2019 rose 13.8% to 1.39 lakh.

Canada is the preferred destination for vocational studies rather than degree courses as the former seems to provide more employment opportunities. Canada is a good choice for immigration as the country offers immense scope for work owing to its low population density.

The most popular higher study courses in Canada for international students are postgraduate diplomas in areas like Business Management, Media, Engineering, Computer Science, and Hospitality.

Safety in Canada:

Canada is one of the safest countries, with one of the highest standards of living in the world. Canada is a free country where people are, by and large, judged on their actions and character, rather than their appearance or country of origin.

Weather

Weather in Canada varies widely depending on where you are. Canada stretches from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean, covering five time zones.

Montreal Weather - The weather here in winter is cold and snowy. The cold in Montreal can be especially biting because of the wind-chill factor. Snowfall usually begins in November and continues through March. During winter months, the daytime temperatures are between -6°C to -15°C. Summer temperatures range from 15°C to 25°C.

Toronto Weather - The weather here in winter is milder than most Canadian cities, yet still cold and snowy. Summer temperatures range from 15°C to 25°C. During winter months, the daytime temperatures are between -10°C to 12°C.

Vancouver Weather - It remains wet, yet mild throughout the year. Summer in Vancouver is pleasantly warm with an average temperature of 22°C. Winters are wet, but snow is rare. Average daily temperatures in winters range from 3°C to 7°C.

Lifestyle tips

Canadians are known to be open-minded and proud of their multicultural and diverse population. Like any other country, Canadians have certain expectations of behavior. Here are a few tips:

  • Be on time for both professional and social occasions
  • Be respectful in conversation and behavior
  • Canadians believe in equality between genders, so show respect to the opposite sex
  • Don't crack jokes or make comments that are insulting to people's race, religion, gender, disability, sexual orientation or appearance
  • Avoid personal questions about things like age, salary, marital status, relationships, and the cost of personal items until you are well-acquainted with people

Language problems: Living in a society where you have to use English or occasionally French on a daily basis can be challenging at first. Some language problems you may initially encounter when you arrive are:

  • You may not understand the local accent right away. Regional accents vary greatly in Canada. Give yourself time to get used to the local accent.
  • Canadians might not understand you right away. You will also have your own accent. Speak slowly and don't be shy about asking others to speak slowly if you are having a hard time understanding them.
  • Canadians use a lot of slang in their speech and it might take you some time before you understand all of it.
  • Humour is an integral part of Canadian English. This should be interpreted as a sign of friendliness, not disrespect.
  • Canadians use lots of abbreviations in their speech (for example, TA for Teachers Assistant or Poli Sci for Political Science). If you don't understand something, simply ask the meaning of it.

Participation: It is necessary to participate in all activities during your classes. You may be asked to participate in class discussions, group work, or other activities. It is very important to participate outside of the classroom as well. This will provide you with many opportunities to practice your English skills in many different settings.

Making friends: Try not to be shy. Remember that making friends is important to everyone in their first year of university. Saying "please" and "thank you" are important Canadian customs, and your relationships will improve if you express your gratitude and appreciation to those around you.

Accommodation

Firstly, you need to decide whether you want to live in university-managed accommodation, or with a private landlord. Choosing university-managed accommodation can also give you a catered or self-catered option. Catered accommodation offers the benefits of your meals being cooked for you and a degree of certainty with meal costs.

If you have an idea about what you prefer, the accommodation office at your university will be able to tell you what accommodation they have available - so that’s the place to start. If you are thinking of renting from a private landlord or if your chosen university can’t offer you anything in its own residential facility, the accommodation office should be able to provide you with a list of private properties and landlords in the area.

Wherever you choose to live, you should make sure that you know your contractual rights and responsibilities. In most cases, you will be asked to enter into a tenancy agreement, which you should read thoroughly before you sign it.

Orientation

Orientation week is mandatory for international students so you want to be sure and arrive before it starts. This is the time where you will be introduced to the university and its services, as well as enroll in your classes. It is essential that you read your guidebook, which is provided by the college. The guide explains each part of the admission process.

Activities

Along with sports, colleges offer extra-curricular activities that provide students a wide range of experiences. Music, drama, science, and literary societies in colleges offer opportunities for outdoor education and other leisure activities. Visits to theatres and concerts, and to places relevant to the courses of study such as art galleries and museums, religious centres or historical sites, scientific companies, and projects are all part of college life.